The Kite Runner Review

 

 

The Kite Runner coverA historical drama novel by Khaled Hosseini.

 

The Kite Runner tells a heart throbbing story of unusual friendship of Amir and his servant Hassan. They were two teenagers from Kabul, Afghanistan who grew up, and spent all their childhood and adolescence together. Yet there were so many differences between them. Amir was a rich scholar while Hassan was an uneducated poor boy. Amir was a soft kid while Hassan was always the courageous one. And most importantly, Amir was a Pashtun while Hassan was a Hazara. Hazara was a peripheral ethnic minority in Afghanistan which later would be genocidal massacred by Taliban. Amir delighted Hassan’s company yet it was painfully shameful for a Pashtun like him to admit that the Hazara was like a brother to him. On one fateful day, Amir consciously left his brother to be persecuted by another Pashtun, an unjustifiable decision which soon would change their relationship forever.

Later on, when Russia invaded Afghanistan and plundered its freedom and peace, fate decided the two boys to be separated. Amir moved to the great United States while Hassan stayed behind. Notwithstanding the detachment from his sinful and gratuitous past, Amir could never find closure of what he did in Afghanistan.

 

Besides the great story the novel narrates, it also recounts historical moments that took place in Afghanistan. It describes the peaceful Afghanistan before all the invasions and the uninhabitable dilapidated Afghanistan after all the bombings. I very much believe it includes the actual depiction of Afghans current dreary condition. The Kite Runner will not just put you in a roller coaster of feelings but it will also arouse deep condolences towards the wretched Afghans. As a matter of fact, the novel is a product of an appalling trip to Afghanistan which eventually turned the author an activist himself. Khaled established a foundation which aims to help building schools and hospitals for people in Afghanistan.

 

Commentary:

 

Story-wise, I was completely engrossed in the plot. Khaled has this exquisitely captivating writing style, it almost convinced me that his tale is intertwined with poems. As to the main character, Amir, Khaled precisely made him a human. Amir is not a wicked person indeed, but he is a human who makes foul and revolting decisions now and then. To me personally, a human chief character gives the story a realistic notion which I prefer to one dimensional narrative where a good character equals to a no flaw personality. Khaled has managed to convey a fictitious story as if it’s a true one.

 

Totally unrelated, I am an Indonesian. And I am astounded by how much I can relate to Afghans’ customs. I recognize several Farsi words albeit I barely know anything about Farsi language. We also practice some of their traditions here in Indonesia. Even we also make similar jokes to theirs. Thus I think The Kite Runner would perhaps offer more fulfilment to Indonesians.

 

– Sky –

 

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