My Favorite Half Night Stand – Review

Storyline

Millie Morris is a beautiful but secretive criminologist, who has four of strictly platonic best guy friends from work, Reid, Chris, Ed, and Alex. These four are about all friends Millie hangs out with on daily basis. Pretty normal stuff they do together really, they have lunch, get coffee, talk and gossip together, and on some nights also play gameboard in one of their houses. Everything is fun and fine. Until one night, when Millie gets a bit too inebriated, and has unplanned sex with Reid who suddenly looks muscular, and handsome, and sexy under the wine light.

Sex between bestfriends is never a good idea.

Reid Campbell is a hot neuroscience associate professor who stays single because he’s a workaholic who marries his job. Though under his professional cape, he is a sensitive guy who absolutely wants to talk about the unintended sex he’s just had with his only hot but distant best girl friend. But Millie ducks off every conversation which possibly heads that way. And that just vexes the hell out of Reid.  

Concurrently, UC Santa Barbara, where five of them work, is expecting a gala in the near future. And the gang has talked about how they are all single and have nobody to take to an event where all dancing and coupely things will be all over. So they’ve decided to try a dating app to find a plus one each for them.

It’s just, divulging her personal stuff in her profile really doesn’t sit well with Millie. So she creates another ‘fake’ account under a different name. Which straightaway gets 98% match with Reid’s profile. At first, she finds it funny, and right away throws a Monopoly joke as a hint at Reid which he obliviously doesn’t pick up. But after several other clues and Reid is still in his oblivion, the chat under a fake profile has shifted into a more serious catfishing. Millie starts to enjoy being more of herself, and to share a lot more about herself comfortably under not really her name. But what’s comfortable and convenient to her doesn’t mean the same for Reid. All the sex, plus the catfishing, even Millie knows she’s going down.

Comments

NOPE.

Nope.

No.

This one is not romantic at all! There’s really no flirting going on, because they don’t send each other sweet short messages. Instead, they send long, serious, full of self-confession MISSIVES. Oh, my. The only thing this book has done is making me crave for flirtatious teasing more than I’ve ever had.

Saying that Millie is an aloof person might be an understatement. She is EXTREMELY uncommunicative. Hell, she evidently has real social problem that she needs to tend to. She is so not ready for a relationship, let alone one with her hottest bestfriend. Hence, Millie takes a whole lot of space in the story to apologize, over and over, and to feel guilty about what she’s done, repetitively, and to again and again, weigh between her fondness to Reid and her confined comfort zone, and to constantly try and fail to be her better self. Which leaves Reid not too much space to do anything, really. It’s that kind of relationship which one of the lovers takes almost all the work, because she’s sort of the only one with lots of problems.

I honestly think that it would have been nicer, if Reid had been more sympathetic to Millie’s situation, rather than being so harsh and demanding all the time.

Though as often with CLo, this book is written in my favorite way, which is switching account between Millie and Reid’s side, I must say, this time it’s such a waste to even bother with that. The story didn’t really slide whenever Reid’s part was in. I really didn’t see the point of having his version of the story at all.

But, happy ending for everyone, and I mean, everyone, is a good cover-up. Thank God, I still got that, at least.

Overall, definitely no re-read, but it was okay-fun.

Instagram : @skytalksrubbish

2 thoughts on “My Favorite Half Night Stand – Review

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