Best And Worst (2020: First Quarter)

Hi, Nerdies!

For this recap, unfortunately, I will have to be very well imbalanced, because Ugh, there’s so many great books I’ve read this quarter! So unfair it is, four bests and one “the” worst!

BESTS

I think it’s relatively safe to say that these two below are included in the most-renowned classics of all time. I don’t always find classics live up to its longevity, but Animal Farm and Pride & Prejudice are among the books that I can totally see the reason why they’re such a legend.

Animal Farm by George Orwell

It’s a satire of 1917 Russian Revolution.

One day, an old-and-dying boar bestows his folks in an animal farm with a utopian dream, laying out an idea that life will only be fair, if the animals could own the farm and govern it among and for themselves. This condition will be achieved by means of rebelling against its current human owner. The rebellion will happen, as of when, the old boar is unsure, but it will certainly happen.

Not long after that, the visionary old boar dies. After his demise, the animals start to discuss his ideas more seriously. The chain of discourses eventually culminates on two only other boars take the dreamy conception to reality. First, they gather the animals’ strength to chase out the existing owner, and then, establish a new set of rules for their newfound society. The maxim the animals hold is that all animals are supposed to work equally hard, and to have the products fairly distributed among themselves.

But things take an unexpected turn. Ever since the change of society, the two leader boars have never stopped fighting each other. Eventually one of them exits the scuffle as a winner and chases the other out as a lose. After taking an absolute control of the farm, the winner begins to change a couple of things among the animals. Gradually, he morphs their brand new society into another form of social orders, where one animal dictates all other animals.

Pride & Prejudice by Jane Austen

It’s a love story between Pride and Prejudice. Pride is attracted by Prejudice’s shrewdness and liveliness, but is hindered from showing his interest because he’s to prideful to admit that he loves someone from a lower social class. And with his ill social nature, it’s easy for Prejudice to take Pride as a mean and unfriendly character. Prejudice chooses to believe her own predisposition right off the bat. Even before she hears numerous tales of Pride’s shameless manner from her neighbors.

It’s crystal clear that Pride and Prejudice are not a good equation to generate love. But against all odds, they find their way to be together, even if they have to go through such a teasing and vexing path first!  

Bird Box by Josh Malerman

This one is just downright great thriller. It’s made a movie titled the same. Check it out!

Full review : Bird Box Review

How To Walk Away by Katherine Center

It’s a story of a woman who’s lost her life as she knows it in a plane’s crash which takes away her ability to walk. Margaret has to learn the hard way that one can’t forever focus on what’s been lost, and who’s to blame. There’s time she needs to finally move on and get her precious life back. With or without pieces of her old life. How To Walk Away is truly one inspirational piece. It will sadden you with the all the wrongness of the event, while also encouraging you with a deep box full of positive messages.

ABSOLUTE WORST

When I put this book under worst category, I really, really. Really, mean it. There’s no book that I’ve read, that can match how bad this novel is. And I am 1000% serious.

After by Anna Todd

Criticizing this book makes me angry, and I’ve done that once. So not repeating that and making myself upset, just go After – Angry Review to read on how bad the book is.

Instagram : @rubbish.talk

17 thoughts on “Best And Worst (2020: First Quarter)

  1. Great list! I am THRILLED that you loved P&P enough to put it here! I must’ve read it 762982 times already and it never gets old. I haven’t read Bird Box but I have watched the film, and I felt like I was always on the verge of a heart attack lol. When they made it I was weak with relief. Was the experience similar with the book? (Also, I have never been tempted to pick up After but I lol’ed at your angry review 😂 I’m going to file that category away in my mind for future reference!)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi, Gilana!! P&P was great. Not only was it enjoyable, it was also insightful! Bird Box was great, It’s a genuinely good thriller with a remarkable writing style. And After? I can’t believe that it’s part of a series. And it has like five books in it, I’d jump off cliff before read them. lol.

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  2. I’ve yet to find an author that I enjoy more than Orwell, unless it is a short essay by Jonathan Swift, A Modest Proposal. If you haven’t yet read this brilliant, razor sharp piece, you can read it online at many sites. It is short.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Animal Farm by a county mile. But then I read a lot of George Orwell books many moons back when studying English lit at school. Would recommend Nineteen Eighty-Four if you haven’t read that.
    The movie Birdbox had mixed camps. I liked it however someone said the ending in the book is more brutal/sad. Maybe ill give it a read

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Seeing you’ve read the book, see the film.
        I’d also recommend “Cannary Row” (John Steinbeck), “On the Road” (Jack Kerouac) and “catcher in the rye” (J. D. Salinger) to add to your list…if you haven’t read them yet.
        #HappyReading

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      1. I find the entire book hilarious. Sad, but hilarious. This is especially how the pigs would make small changes in their credo over and over until their society completely changes from Old Major’s ideals—even to a point that the pigs walk on two legs to imitate their former masters.

        It’s a book pointing out the absurdity of the USSR and absurdity is based on tragedy.

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